centralasian (centralasian) wrote,
centralasian
centralasian

[PER] alibi witnesses pictured


TIM DURHAM
Skeet shooting, Tulsa, Oklahoma
11 alibi witnesses placed Durham at a skeet-shooting
competition at the time of the crime
Served 3.5 years of a 3,220-year sentence for Rape and Robbery, 2002


потом обнаружилось, что он невиновен.

а вот ещё история

"Clyde Charles served 17 years of a life sentence for rape. The crime of which he was found guilty was an attack on a Louisiana woman in March 1981.

She was at the roadside, looking for help with her car, when a man dragged her off the road, beat her with a lead pipe and raped her. Charles was coming home from a job on a construction site and was spotted hitch-hiking along the same road; he was arrested and later identified as the attacker.

It took him 10 years to gain access to the DNA evidence that eventually cleared him - and when he did, it pointed instead to his brother, Marlo, who had been working on the same site and walking along the same road a little earlier."

фотовыставка Taryn Simon в Gagosian Gallery фоторассказывает о примерно 50-ти таких вот случаях. так и называется - The Innocents.

линк туда стоит на картинке, а под катом - небольшая статья, на английском.

The picture of innocence
Morgan Falconer
The Independent - United Kingdom; Jun 28, 2004

Clyde Charles served 17 years of a life sentence for rape before he was exonerated and released in 1999. He knows a lot about prison, and - looking at the American photographer Taryn Simon's depiction of Charles outside the Terrebonne Criminal Justice Complex in Louisiana, sitting on the boot of his car beneath a troubled grey sky - you'd imagine that it was the same penitentiary he got to know so well over all those years. But it isn't.

The crime of which he was found guilty was an attack on a Louisiana woman in March 1981. She was at the roadside, looking for help with her car, when a man dragged her off the road, beat her with a lead pipe and raped her. Charles was coming home from a job on a construction site and was spotted hitch-hiking along the same road; he was arrested and later identified as the attacker. It took him 10 years to gain access to the DNA evidence that eventually cleared him - and when he did, it pointed instead to his brother, Marlo, who had been working on the same site and walking along the same road a little earlier. Terrebonne Criminal Justice Complex is where Marlo is now serving time.

Simon's photo series, The Innocents, documents about 50 such cases of wrong conviction. A number of them are on show at the Gagosian Gallery in London. They each return to the fabric of the men's stories and portray them in a spot that came to have a special significance in their cases - the scene of the crime, the place of arrest, their alibi. And each is invested with a peculiar kind of charged theatricality that attests to the drama of the events.

Many of the cases have a terrifying randomness and inverted logic. Frederick Daye had his picture taken after being pulled over for a minor traffic violation, and soon afterward he found himself being jailed for 10 years for rape. The woman whose evidence convicted Troy Webb of rape initially said he was too old when police presented a photograph of him, so they just found one taken four years before the crime; he was fingered on the basis of that.

And then there is Kevin Byrd, a black man who was identified in a grocery store by a rape victim months after the attack. Although she originally said a clean-shaven white man had attacked her, her evidence had Byrd jailed. Only a filing error saved the case evidence from scheduled destruction and allowed the DNA testing that subsequently cleared him. Even when it did, it took a full four months and a court hearing before George Bush, then the Governor of Texas, would sign his pardon. In Simon's picture of Byrd, he stands alone outside the store at which the woman identified him, wearing a confused and angered expression - as well he might.

Simon set out across the United States to create these portraits after an earlier commission to photograph men whose exoneration had freed them from Death Row. She was guided in the later work by The Innocence Project, a scheme set up by the civil-rights attorneys Peter Neufeld and Barry Scheck, who offer pro bono representation to inmates who claim that DNA evidence could prove their innocence. They are responsible for most of the post-conviction DNA exonerations in the US.

After so much injustice, Simon's pictures elevate the men again, restoring their dignity without an ounce of sentimental righteousness. One might worry about the elaborate theatricality she lends to the scenes, a quality that's currently fashionable in art photography. But it is apt, as her photographs seem to render the men as the only anchor of reality in a fantastical world that still engulfs them. That she hasn't relied on the rhetoric of truth-telling in the old-fashioned documentary style is also quite proper, as many of the convictions were secured on false identifications encouraged precisely by photographic evidence.

One rape victim, Jennifer Thompson, explained the dreadful circularity of the process. She created a composite sketch of her attacker and then picked out a man, Ronald Cotton, from a photo array because he looked not like her attacker but like her sketch. The process continued in the line-up. "I picked out Ronald because, subconsciously, he resembled the photo, which resembled the composite, which resembled the attacker."

Ronald served 10 years before he was exonerated, much of that time in the same unit as a man who bragged of committing the crime, and who was later proved to have committed it through DNA evidence. In Simon's portrait of Ronald, he stands alongside Jennifer, his big arms hugging her to him. The roles of innocent and guilty are shuffled, and both ended up victims.

такие вот жуткие истории, с "фотоуклоном".

photography
photo_exhibitions
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